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Who’s who in the blog banner? (List)

Who’s who in the featured images gallery? (List)

Crowdsourced images so far:

Missing No More!

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Who’s who in the blog banner (from left to right)

  • Euphemia Haynes (1890 – 1980) – the first African-American woman to get a PhD in mathematics (1943).
  • Kelly Miller (1863-1939) – prominent African-American mathematician, sociologist, and public intellectual. The bust is by African-American sculptor, May Howard Jackson (1877-1931).
  • Vivienne Malone-Mayes (1932-1995) – one of the first African-American women to get a PhD in mathematics and the first from the University of Texas, plus first African-American faculty member at Baylor. Sourced by: Evelyn Lamb and the Texas Collection at Baylor University.
  • Fanny E. Hesse (1850-1934) – microbiologist, born in New York City, moved to Germany, where she suggested agar as a culture medium while working in Robert Koch’s laboratory (small picture above).
  • Eva Klein (1925-) – Jewish Hungarian scientist, who survived the Holocaust by hiding in the University of Budapest. Moved to Sweden and became a biologist, who, among other things led to the identification of natural killer cells – and gave them that name(small picture below).
  • Jessie Isabelle Price (1930-2015) – African-American veterinary microbiologist who first isolated and reproduced the bacteria which was the biggest killer of farmed ducklings. She went on to develop a variety of avian vaccines. (In this photo, she is with her colleagues at Cornell’s Duck Research Laboratory (from left to right): Dr William D. Urban (Director), Dr William F. Dean, Dr. Louis Leibovitz.

Who’s who in the featured images gallery

  • Euphemia Haynes (1890 – 1980) – the first African-American woman to get a PhD in mathematics (1943).
  • Kelly Miller (1863-1939) – prominent African-American mathematician, sociologist, and public intellectual. The bust is by African-American sculptor, May Howard Jackson (1877-1931).
  • Evelyn M. Anderson (1899-1985) – physiologist and biochemist most known for being co-discoverer of adreno-cortical thyroid hormone (ACTH) in 1934. Pictured here with colleagues William Sebrell, Bernardo Houssay and Floyd Doft.
  • Evelyn Boyd Granville (b 1924) – the second African-American woman to get a PhD in mathematics (1949), moving into computer programming with IBM in the 1950s, then to NASA in the 1960s to work on Apollo missions, then to being Professor of Mathematics at California State University.
  • Vivienne Malone-Mayes (1932-1995) – one of the first African-American women to get a PhD in mathematics and the first from the University of Texas, plus first African-American faculty member at Baylor. Sourced by: Evelyn Lamb and the Texas Collection at Baylor University.
  • Sophie Lutterlough (1910-2009) – a pioneering African-American entomologist (zoologist for insects), she moved past a racial barrier that prevented her from working on the curation and scientific side of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) – after over a decade working as an elevator operator there. A species of mite is named for her.
  • Bell Shimada (1922-1958) – a fisheries scientist, who went from being a Japanese-American internee, to collecting and synthesizing data on the effects of bombing in Japan at the end of World War II, to a Masters of Science in fisheries and making an important impact on what we know about tuna. He died in a plane crash on a research trip at the age of 36.
  • Lydia Villa-Komaroff (b 1947) – a molecular and cellular biologist, who is the third Mexican-American woman to receive a PhD in this field (1975). She is known for co-discovering how bacterial cells can generate insulin, and is a co-founding member of The Society for the Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS).
  • Lisa Cooper (b 1963) – a public health physician and epidemiologist born in Liberia, who is a Professor at Johns Hopkins University. She is known for her research on the impact of race, ethnicity, and gender on the doctor-patient relationship and health disparities and is a MacArthur Fellow (the genius grant).
  • Ana Maria Rey (b 1976 or 1977) – another MacArthur Fellow. She is a theoretical physicist known for her work on ultra-cold atoms. Born in Colombia, she is a Professor at the University of Colorado.

Missing No More! Crowdsourced images

  • Vivienne Malone-Mayes (1932-1995) – one of the first African-American women to get a PhD in mathematics and the first from the University of Texas, plus first African-American faculty member at Baylor. Sourced by: Evelyn Lamb and the Texas Collection at Baylor University.
  • Jennifer Richeson (1972-) – social psychologist and Professor at Northwestern University, MacArthur Fellowship (the genius grant). She researches interracial relations, including using brain imaging studies. Sourced by: Jennifer Richeson responded to a direct request on Twitter.
  • Aprille Ericsson (1963-) – aerospace engineer at NASA. First woman to earn a PhD in mechanical engineering at Howard University, first African-American woman to earn a PhD in engineering at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. She has been working on the Mars mission. Sourced by: Nature, in its story about MissingSciFaces.